Our 2019 candidate survey results demonstrated a continued gender in-balance, despite equal pay being addressed by the publication of the pay gap. Candidates reported examples such as gender dominated offices, role assumptions based upon sex and direct discrimination when recruiting for gender specific products lines.
 
We see this first hand in marketing, creative recruitment, where there are often more women, whereas other recruiter sectors, such as IT and tech are dominated by men. So, what can we do to make a change for a more gender balanced world?
 
 
What do you think gender balanced means?
 
“For me, it would mean completely equal representation in all walks of life and most importantly, represented in key decision-making roles across all industries and businesses. I’d like to see a general acceptance everywhere that the world works better when you consider both male and female inputs as having equal value, and that if you have an imbalance, you’re not going to get optimum results or outputs.”
Sarah Evans, Spark44.
 
 
"The #metoo movement and subsequent rise of feminism has been misinterpreted by many. It’s not about preferential treatment, just equal rights, opportunities and status which is hard to understand if you’ve never faced inequality."
Sarah Poole, Rave Communications
 
Would you say your industry is gender balanced?
 
"Sadly no – our industry is predominantly male dominated, and very much divided into historically male and female roles. Some companies are more progressive than others though, and I’m really encouraged and motivated to work in a business where 50% of the leadership team, and a large proportion of senior managers, are female. I feel this sends a really positive message to other companies and the wider industry as a whole, and it's really inspiring to be a part of it."
Sarah Evans, Spark44.
 
 
"No, I don’t think any industry is. I accept that men and women typically excel in different areas, but this isn’t a blanket rule. And casual statements like “women make the best account handlers” create challenges for both sexes."
Sarah Poole, Rave Communications
 
What do you think you can do personally to help build a gender balanced world?
 
“I try my hardest to maintain a balance at work, when recruiting I try to build teams with equal representation. Ultimately someone needs to have the right skills for the role, but I’m not going to discount people based on their gender, which I think does happen in some businesses.”
 
“I’m not a wallflower, so I’m always willing to shout up and ask those questions that might cause people to squirm a bit – both in and out of work! It’s important to reiterate the message wherever possible because if you can change one person’s perspective it could cause a ripple effect which reaches far and wide.”
Sarah Evans, Spark44.
 
“Stay aware of my own and others behaviour, never make generalised assumptions and ask myself when decision making if the outcome would apply to the opposite sex.”
Sarah Poole, Rave Communications
 
This was a really interesting topic for the team here at blueskies, as a team of mostly women we don’t have the balance that international women's day calls for - which has got us talking about what we can do to encourage male applicants to the roles we advertise.
 
Although we cannot directly change culture of the industries we work with, we can use our unique position to raise awareness and challenge the status quo with both candidates and clients.
 
Because, every voice matters – happy international women’s day! 
 
 

Comments

Post Comment

*
*
*
>
>back to the top